real adventures
imagined adventures
cognitive dissidence
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I grew these little orange babies.

I grew these little orange babies.

"And when we call for education we mean real education. We believe in work. We ourselves are workers, but work is not necessarily education. Education is the development of power and ideal. We want our children trained as intelligent human beings should be, and we will fight for all time against any proposal to educate black boys and girls simply as servants and underlings, or simply for the use of other people. They have a right to know, to think, to aspire."

- W.E.B. Du Bois, Niagara Movement Speech, 1905

I have two new poems out in Union Station Magazine. Thrilled to have had these picked up by a journal whose work I really love, to have the honor of sharing a publication with the homie José (whose poems in this issue crushed my tender heart a little bit), and to have my work accompanied by one of David Ayllon’s incredible illustrations. Read the poems here, and don’t miss the full issue.

joseolivarez:

gotemcoach:

"Before anyone ever cared where I would play basketball, I was a kid from Northeast Ohio. It’s where I walked. It’s where I ran. It’s where I cried. It’s where I bled. It holds a special place in my heart. People there have seen me grow up. I sometimes feel like I’m their son. Their passion can be overwhelming. But it drives me. I want to give them hope when I can. I want to inspire them when I can. My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.
I feel my calling here goes above basketball. I have a responsibility to lead, in more ways than one, and I take that very seriously. My presence can make a difference in Miami, but I think it can mean more where I’m from. I want kids in Northeast Ohio, like the hundreds of Akron third-graders I sponsor through my foundation, to realize that there’s no better place to grow up. Maybe some of them will come home after college and start a family or open a business. That would make me smile. Our community, which has struggled so much, needs all the talent it can get. 
In Northeast Ohio, nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have.”
- LeBron James

eveewing

Nothing is given. Everything is earned.

joseolivarez:

gotemcoach:

"Before anyone ever cared where I would play basketball, I was a kid from Northeast Ohio. It’s where I walked. It’s where I ran. It’s where I cried. It’s where I bled. It holds a special place in my heart. People there have seen me grow up. I sometimes feel like I’m their son. Their passion can be overwhelming. But it drives me. I want to give them hope when I can. I want to inspire them when I can. My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.

I feel my calling here goes above basketball. I have a responsibility to lead, in more ways than one, and I take that very seriously. My presence can make a difference in Miami, but I think it can mean more where I’m from. I want kids in Northeast Ohio, like the hundreds of Akron third-graders I sponsor through my foundation, to realize that there’s no better place to grow up. Maybe some of them will come home after college and start a family or open a business. That would make me smile. Our community, which has struggled so much, needs all the talent it can get.

In Northeast Ohio, nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have.”

- LeBron James

eveewing

Nothing is given. Everything is earned.

Text to my friend William at 2:46 AM: “William, are you up by any chance? I hope not. I have a piece of classical piano stuck in my head and I can’t remember what it is. I want to hear it so badly and I can’t look it up. It’s driving me batty.”

William: “I woke up at 5, saw your messages, and was tempted to answer, but I figured you might be asleep by then. But here are the blind suggestions I was going to make: Cloud Atlas Sextet (the perfect mystery music to have stuck in your head, though not necessarily piano music). Chopin Nocturne No. 1. Beethoven’s Moonight Sonata (too obvious; you would have recognized it). Elgar’s Enigma Variations (appealing for transparent reasons, but symphonic, not piano). Keith Jarrett’s Koln Concert (not so midnight-mysterious, and more jazz than classical, but a great piece). Beethoven sonata “Pathetique” (boringly famous, but classic).”

It was “Pathetique.” But the part I had stuck in my head was the second movement so when I was desperately searching last night and tried “Pathetique” and heard the first movement I quickly dismissed it. Finally resolved it this afternoon after sending William a recording of myself humming it (off-key). Boringly famous it is, but gorgeous. Try it next time you can’t sleep.

"You’ll be hard pressed to find a Chicago native that doesn’t think Chicago has a problem. We don’t get in our feelings about hearing truths about our city, which is more than I can say about natives of certain other cities.

What most of us are mad about is that the violence in Chicago was double the current numbers ten years ago, but no one gave a damn— locally or nationally. No one cared about brown folks dying on the South and West Sides. Once Obama got elected, everybody decided to finally give a damn. But it’s all faux interest. It’s gawking. People are using Chief Keef and ‘black on black violence’ as strawmen, but not saying anything about Rahm over here closing 50 schools in brown neighborhoods. Or the history of structural racism in the city. Or that intense policing of brown neighborhoods isn’t a viable option. Or that fact that community organizations have been rallying around the issue of youth murders for at least ten years.

It’s personal. I’m related to people on these victim lists. I went to school with some of them. If you’re down to discuss the racism and classism that’s the root of this issue, cool. If not, grab a deep dish from Giordano’s and a mix bag from Garrett’s and get out.”

— the ever-astute Diamond Sharp